Smart Money
Warner Manufacturing

Smart Money

Regular price $2.00 Sale price $19.98 Unit price per
Shipping calculated at checkout.
Product Description Edward G. Robinson and James Cagney were teamed for the only time in their careers in Smart Money. Robinson has the larger part as a small- town barber who fancies himself a big-time gambler. He travels to the Big City in the company of his younger brother Cagney, who wants to make sure that Robinson isn't fleeced by the high-rollers. Unfortunately Robinson has a weakness for beautiful blondes, most of whom take him for all his money or betray him in some other manner. The cops aren't keen on Robinson's gambling activities, but they can pin nothing on him until he accidentally kills Cagney in a fight. The incident results in a jail term for manslaughter, and a more sober-sided outlook on life for the formerly flamboyant Robinson. Watch closely in the first reel of Smart Money for an unbilled appearance by Boris Karloff as a dope pusher. Amazon.com Edward G. Robinson spent a lot of his Warner years resisting Little Caesar typecasting, and Smart Money is a fascinating case in point. Although the story of "Nick the Barber" recalls elements of Robinson's starmaking hit, the actor insisted on script modifications so that Nick, a compulsive gambler, emerges as a sympathetic character--and a fatally soft touch where women are concerned. His itinerary takes him from small-town barbershop with an after-hours game in the back to operating his own swank casino in the big city, but he never comes off as a criminal except by prissy legal technicality. Directed by Alfred E. Green, the movie marks the sole occasion of Warner gangster stars Robinson and James Cagney working together. Really, it's Robinson's picture--though Jimmy the Gent outshines him in a classic scene where they discuss a woman's attributes ... in mime. Without quite endorsing Nick's line of work, the film takes a distinctly jaundiced view of the calculating district attorney who sets out to trap him. That's characteristic of the studio in this pre-Code era, and so is the startlingly throw-away depiction of small-town crook Boris Karloff as a dope dealer. --Richard T. Jameson